dough proofing/retarding pans

Discussion in 'The Think Tank' started by norma427, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. norma427

    norma427 Member

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    Since I have limited space to store my dough I am thinking about buying dough proofing/retarding pans. I can't fit regular proofing pan in my deli case or small pizza prep refrigerator. I am now using NSF white plastic pans with lids. They fit tight, but I think using the pans will save me space. Can anyone tell me of their experiences with these pans and where the best place would be to purchase them.
    Thanks, Norma
     
  2. Tom Lehmann

    Tom Lehmann Well-Known Member

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    Norma;
    Another consideration is to use plastic bread bags. These are available from most suppliers. The only thing I don't like about the individual dough containers is the space they take up and the need to be cleaned. With the plastic bags al you need to do is to oil the dough ball and drop it into the bag, trist to close and tuck the twisted tail under the dough ball as you place it into the cooler. To use the dough, just drop it out of the bag into a bowl of flour and you're ready to go. The bags might be able to be reused (they don't take up much space at all). If I'm planning to reuse the bags I just stuff them into a clean bag, then send them over to the dough making area for reuse. If you won't be reusing them, just toss into the trash as you empty the bag(s). If you opt to go with the plastic bags, get a 1.25 mil. thickness. A case will have 4-wickets of 500 bags each.
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
     
  3. norma427

    norma427 Member

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    Tom,
    That sounds like a great idea! I will buy a case and try your method. Are the dough balls okay to just put in the cooler right after weighing and shaping? Isn't there any time to let them cool down before closing the bag? Won't they gather moisture in the bag? Sorry to ask all these questions, but usually I mix, weigh the dough, make the balls, put in plastic containers, oil the balls, then let lid off for about two and a half hours. Then put the lid on.
    Thanks, Norma
     
  4. Tom Lehmann

    Tom Lehmann Well-Known Member

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    Norma;
    Not to worry. Because the bag doesn't create an insulating layer, there is no need to leave the bag open to help cool the dough ball(s) down. It won't sweat either because the bag will be in direct contact with the dough, and sweating only takes place when there is an air space around the dough ball such as is the case when cans or boxes are used. Pretty nifty, eh?
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
     
  5. norma427

    norma427 Member

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    Tom,
    That is nifty. Makes sense, if no air is in bag there is no insulating layer, then no sweating either. Also saves times on cooling down. Saves money, too!
    Thank you for your advise. I will let you know next week how it goes.
    Norma :D
     
  6. norma427

    norma427 Member

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    Tom,
    I have one more question. What happens with the expansion of the dough? Does the bag affect that?
    Thanks, Norma
     
  7. Tom Lehmann

    Tom Lehmann Well-Known Member

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    Norma;
    Ahhh, that is why it is important to twist the bag closed and tuck the pony tail under the bag. This allows for some additional expansion of the bag, in addition to the normal stretching as the dough ball expands in size. If you were to close the bag with a knot, the bag would have a high probability of rupturing as the gas pressure increased, the twist and tuck mechod of closure allows for some escape of gas, plus a little additional expansion. In all my years, using this method, I've never had a bag burst.
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
     
  8. norma427

    norma427 Member

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    Tom,
    Thanks, again for the advise. I purchased the bags today and will try your method on Monday. Will let you know next week what my results were. What you said also makes sense in twisting the bag pony tail style so it can expand some.
    Norma
     
  9. norma427

    norma427 Member

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    Tom,
    Thank you so much for all the advise. The bags worked out great today. I made your NY Style dough yesterday and oiled the balls and put them into the bags like you told me. There was no sweating, they could expand, and the dough was great. Looks like I can forget the dough proofing/retarding pans, thanks to you. :D I liked how the dough came out so easily from the bags, right into the bench flour. No, pans to wash either. That is a big plus!
    Thank you, Norma
     
  10. blvdpub

    blvdpub New Member

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    How do you store the dough balls in the frig? What if you have 100 dough balls? Currently stacking 6 per box 20 high, If going to bags do you stack the bags on top of each other? I am running out of space and I would like to elimiate the dough box if possible.
     
  11. Tom Lehmann

    Tom Lehmann Well-Known Member

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    When using plastic bags rather than dough boxes you don't need to cross stack anything because you aren't using dough boxes anymore. Instead, you're putting the oiled and bagged dough balls on 18 X 26 aluminum sheet pans, depending upon the size of the dough balls, you should be able to get 12 to 15 dough balls on a sheet. Place the sheet pans of dough balls on a rack in the cooler and just forget about them until the following day. Then handle them in your normal manner.
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
     
  12. pizzanerd

    pizzanerd Member

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    Tom,

    You indicated earlier that the plastic bags can be reused. Are there any health issues involved in reusing the bags, or do they have to be washed and dried before reusing?

    PN
     
  13. Tom Lehmann

    Tom Lehmann Well-Known Member

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    PN;
    I've always just put the used bags into a clean plastic box and just reused them as is for the week, this means the bags will typically be used two to three times before being discarded. As long as they are being handled in a clean and sanitary manner there shouldn't be any problem, however, the final decision will rest upon your local health department inspector. I did run into a problem at one store a number of years ago. It seems the operator was putting the used bags into a cardboard box rather than a clean (sanitary) plastic box. Once they stopped using the cardboard box, they were once again in the good graces of their health department. The reason why I always recommend using new bread bags is because they are relatively cheap, and they are approved for direct food contact.
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
     

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