How to hire pizza makers?

Discussion in 'Marketing / Increasing Sales' started by Lee Kim, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. Lee Kim

    Lee Kim Member

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    I will need to hire a pizza maker soon for my restaurant. Can anyone suggest the best strategy to go about it, i.e. newspaper ad, Craigslist, trying to poach someone from a pizza chain? Thanks!
     
  2. noreason

    noreason Active Member

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    Pizza maker seem to be the hardest position to fill for us. I would try every way possible. I don't really poach, but I do offer better wages in hopes that someone notices and then applies with us. The only problem with that method is that they usually leave when someone else offers them a nickel more...

    My new method for hiring is finding someone with no experience. The key here is to look for great traits in the person. Work ethic, sense of urgency, etc... Over the years I've noticed the end result is usually always better when you train someone from the ground up rather than try and find someone with great work ethic that is also a great pizza maker. It does take time and a lot of patience thought.
     
    janeoftrades and sparrowspizza like this.
  3. noreason

    noreason Active Member

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    Also, is your restaurant a pizzeria? If so, can you be the pizza maker, or are you already stuck somewhere else?

    I am always the pizza maker the first 6 or so months when we open. I wouldn't have it any other way... Well, unless I bring someone from another store who is already well trained on how WE do things. If you just grab someone without training them thoroughly, they are most likely going to do things the way they have done it for someone else the second you walk away.

    The more I type, the more I realize I'm a bit worried that you are opening a pizzeria without knowing how to hire a pizza maker... Unless of course you are adding pizza to your already successful restaurant? Then again I don't think you would be asking how to hire someone if that was the case.

    Anyway, I don't know your situation, I just hate seeing people go all in on restaurants. I've seen it kill people (literally) because they just dove in. (Yes, I've also seen it make people extremely wealthy). I think the best advice I can personally give you here, not that you're asking for it, is to take however long it takes you to get every aspect of this game figured out, and when you finally do get it all figured out, ask yourself one last time, "is this what I want to do for (hopefully) the rest of my life?".

    It's a whole lot cheaper figuring all of it out before you sign that lease. Trust me.
     
  4. Lee Kim

    Lee Kim Member

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    Thank you so much for your detailed reply!
    Yes, it's a pizzeria. Before buying it from the previous owner two months ago I ran it for over 3 years doing all jobs, including making pizza making. During this time we've never hired anyone, except a cashier. Thus far I've been working 7 days a week, no weekends, days off, holidays or anything. Right now, we're the #1-rated pizzeria in our town on Yelp, Trip Advisor, etc. Now that I started promoting the place (previous owner didn't believe in advertising) and just hired Mailshark to do 1000 mailings a week, I expect (hopefully!) to get busier. My biggest concern is that I don't want to be the only person who can do things around here. What if I get sick? What if I have a family emergency? Before, it was my boss's problem. By now that I'm the boss (of myself, mostly:)) I want to have another person who can back me up.
    Your advice is very helpful.I think I'm leaning towards hiring someone with little or no experience and training that person.
     
  5. bodegahwy

    bodegahwy Well-Known Member

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    1. Craigslist which is free but in the post we clearly state that they must apply in person. We do NOT provide a phone number or email address.

    2. Paid promoted facebook post with demographic and geographic targeting. We would generally do about $30 for a paid post and run it a couple of times.

    3. Box topper help wanted flyer on boxes for a week or so.

    4. Offer a bonus to you employees for referrals. $50 to the employee that refers a new employee after that employee works 30 days in good standing with some minimum number of hours and another $50 after 90 or 120 days....
     
  6. Lee Kim

    Lee Kim Member

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    Wow, this really broadened my horizons! Thank you!
     
  7. j_r0kk

    j_r0kk Member

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    Hi Lee. During the hiring process, my fundamental approach was to "hire the personality, train for the position". Basically, hire the work ethic and ability to be coached. The training part is easy once the quality applicant is hired. Good luck!
     
  8. pizzaadmin

    pizzaadmin Member

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    In my opinion, You may post classified ads or advertise online your job post in local region.
    Post your contact details also with job post ....:)
     
  9. mike450r

    mike450r New Member

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    We found some good people on indeed. To echo what was said above. The employees that I have had that could best replicate my pie were the ones with little or no experience making pizza before they were hired. I have had many people from other shops and especially chains that just couldn't break away from the way they were taught.