Brewers Yeast

A VPN pizza dough formula calls for Brewers Yeast.
What is “Brewers Yeast” and how might it relate to a comparable amount of instant dry yeast, which is what I normally use.

The formula is on the link below, …after going to the link, you will need to click on “Learn”, then “Recipes” on the next page

Otis

  [http://www.anticapizzeria.net/vpn/vpn_frames-index.htm](http://www.anticapizzeria.net/vpn/vpn_frames-index.htm)

Brewer’s Yeast is higher in Chromium levels…not to be confused with Baker’s yeast. It is more nutritional…can be found through midwest supplies and other distributors. Their website is www.midwestsupplies.com

Otis,

What is really meant is baker’s yeast, i.e., fresh yeast. As I understand it, “brewer’s yeast” had its origins in beer making, where yeast that settled out in the beer could be, and was, used for baking. It can still be done, and there are many different possible strains, but it is not a reliable and consistent method. Hobbyists might experiment with it but professionals use factory-grown yeasts.

As you know as a long-time follower of Tom Lehmann, if you are using instant dry yeast (IDY), you would triple the IDY by weight to get to the corresponding amount of fresh yeast to use.

Peter

can Brewer’s yeast be used to make pizza dough ?

Otis

Otis,

I take it that you mean the nutritional form of brewer’s yeast which is yeast obtained as a by-product of brewing, and dried and killed. It has no leavening power, so it can’t be used to raise a dough. Although I have never heard of anyone doing it, it might be used in small amounts as a flavoring agent (it has a nutty flavor) in a dough. Some vegans use it instead of Parmesan cheese on a pizza.

Peter

Peter,

 That's what I thought also

Look at the link below for a dough formula. Let me know what you think about the “Brewer’s Yeast” they refer to as a leavening agent.

PS, on the link, you may have to go to “learn”, then “recipes”

Otis

      [http://www.anticapizzeria.net/vpn/vpn_frames-index.htm](http://www.anticapizzeria.net/vpn/vpn_frames-index.htm)

Otis,

I’m sure that the use of the term “brewer’s yeast” in the recipe you referenced was as the result of a poor tranlation. If you go to the Italian Ministry document (in Italian) that governs what is an authentic Neapolitan pizza, you will see the term “lievito di birra” used in reference to the leavening agent. If you use an online translator, such as that provided by Google, for example, as I did when the document first came out in 2004, you will get a translation “yeast of beer”. Now, if you click on “Charter” at the VPN site, you will see that “yeast of beer” is the term used, not brewer’s yeast. The recipe you mentioned was added long after the Charter section. I first saw the recipe in Nov. 2005.

I calculated that the baker’s percent for yeast in the recipe comes to 1.25%, by weight of flour. That’s for fresh (cake) yeast. For IDY, it would be 0.42%, by weight of flour. The recipe is silent as to the type and duration of fermentation, but I am fairly certain that a room-temperature fermentation is intended, most likely for about 7-8 hours, which is fairly typical of what is used in Naples. The Ministry document also allows for the use of a natural form of yeast, such as a preferment, starter or other natural culture, which are used by a small number of Neapolitan pizza operators.

Peter

Peter,

That's what I concluded also, just a use of terms.

I use IDY myself, at about .5% of flour weight, close to the VPN formula.

Other than the 2% sugar that I use, my formula is similar. My water is about 2% more than the VPN’s formula.

I am always open to new ideas, fortunately, with a mobile pizzeria, doing different events, I can experiment more than if I had a restaurant.

Otis

 [http://homepage.mac.com/otisgunn/PhotoAlbum27.html](http://homepage.mac.com/otisgunn/PhotoAlbum27.html)

Otis,

The biggest problem when using 00 flour is that to get an authentic Neapolitan pizza you need a really hot oven, above 800 degrees F. Otherwise, the crust will be light in color (tan, or almost white) and any attempts to bake the pizza longer to get more color will usually result in a hard, crispy crust rather than the soft, chewy one that is characteristic of a Neapolitan pie. Using a lower hydration and also some oil in the dough (which is not used in doughs in Naples) will alleviate the problem somewhat but you won’t get an authentic Neapolitan style pizza.

Peter

Peter,

You are sure right about that.   My ovens do not get close to that.

Fun trying to make a better pizza though.
I am using Caputo flour now, it works well, others work as well for me.
Maybe if I had an 800 + degree oven it would make a difference.
thanks for your input,

Otis