corporate marketing

What is the best way to market to big companies and corporations? Offering discounts on big orders etc is easy but getting the HR managet interested or getting someone to put pizzeria menus in the office canteen is difficult. Any advice?

My advice, from years in the private sector and haggling over lunch with co-workers, is to focus on flexibility, speed of service, and delivery if you do that.

Market yourself as the solution to those hassels of working in an office building and having to make the lunch decision every day: variety, food quality, speed, delivery, etc. Also include value added services like soft drinks, paper goods, faxing or emailing orders, guaranteed delivery time if sent by a certain time, even group discounts could be good. That is all about marketing to individuals who will have your menu and order for themselves and a couple of buddies.

Getting in the door could about focusing on incrased prodctivity for the workforce as trhey will not leave premises, healthy and balanced food items, maybe even a corporate discount card or something like that. Also put together a “catering” or large order proposal for the management to have in hand. sell the whole package and see what you can get. Remember to focus on what you perceive as the challenges that the people are facing in accomplishing lunch, and how your company best meets those needs.

Nick,

Sound advice.

-J_r0kk

Nick I think it is time to write an operations manual…I think it would be a “best seller”…RCS…

PS…J can be a co-contributor…

Might be fun at that. I could find a decent co-author and we could make money for both of us to retire.

Nick,

You’re awesome !!!

Thank you for all your generious words of wisedom !!!

Lila

Thanks for that. But my problem is getting the menus to the people. I go in with free pizzas and money off/ free pizza vouchers and I can only get as far as the secretary who either is only there for two weeks or who keeps all the vouchers for herself which pass their expirary date before she uses them.
Or place like Google who pay for all the food their staff eats, how do I become some of the food that’s bought by the HR dept for the staff?

Creativity. Period. That’s where you separate the amateurs from the pros. I would make it so difficult for the secretary to horde them that she could not stand herself. Put a mark/stamp on each voucher. Tell her that for every 5/10/15 vouchers that are redeemed from this office in the next two weeks by someone other than her . . . she gets a freebie, discount, cash rebate or something she cannot resist. Make it too much for her not to help you out.

Networking. Be where the Google people are. Chamber of Commerce, the nearby convenience store, wherever. Schedule a meeting with the HR director or someone in that department with some “juice” and make a professional presentation about the services you offer and why they are irresistible. Tell the person you would like an opportunity to discuss catering, employee benefit programs possibilities, or just that you’d like “to provide such a high quality company with the sort of lunch services that they deserve”. Be bold and daring. Take the approach that you are a business approaching their business as a perspective customer. Google does it all the time selling their services, and are used to the relationship. Get inside their brains and approach them as they believe they would approach a prospective customer.

<< This should be in everyone’s file cabinet anyway>> Prepare and bring them a “propaganda package”. Include a full color brochure, or a flyer with lots of very simple, clearly laid our examples of services you can provide. You can mention that they are negotiable. Include anything that supports your claim to be exceptional and professional. I would include copies of news articles featuring your shop or employees, copies of certifications and licenses your shop holds, awards yo may have won, a copy of your menu, business cards, your logo displayed prominently, and anything else that you can use in a presentation about your business. IF NOTHING ELSE you will display having taken effort to court them as a customer, and that will gain some respect.

They will forget your name and handshake . . . they won’t forget the time you took to present your company to them in a manner that they recognize from their business model. HEck, any business could appreciate that sort of effort and professionalism . . . and from a pizzeria, no less!

great info nick

In the past, I have mailed out letters. Come up with a nice letter explaining the benefits that you can offer (especially large order discounts) and include a menu. I always include my business card so they can contact me directly. Seems to work most of the time for me. Send it to the attention of the “Human Resource” Department or any other department.

I’m in the process of a campaign on this right now. I borrowed (stole) this idea from another pizza shop owner and modified it. Here’s what I’m doing:

I had 12 different post cards printed with demotivational posters (www.despair.com) on the front and a brief pitch on the back extolling the virtues of Cowtown Pizza and our ability to serve corporate clients, reliability, timeliness, account biling, etc.

Right now I’m working on getting the mailing list from Melissa Data (www.melissadata.com) of businesses within a 3-mile radius of my store with between 15 and 75 employees and the name of the office manager.

Next I will send 6 different postcards to the each person on the list staggering the delivery by about 2 days so I get their attention over the course of about 2 weeks. I will follow those up with a personal letter from me with menu, business card, etc. After that I will try to make as many personal sales calls as possible to put a smile and a handshake to the overly eager pizza shop image they have in their heads. On that call I will hand the office manager a card good for a free pizza so they have a chance to try the product.

With $2.00 per in postage I hope this works! But right now I’ve got one customer who orders on account for a small office who has spent almost $6K in the last year. If I can land one more of those it will be worth the effort and expense.