Dough Doctor Questions

This week, Tom Lehmann will be answering questions on PizzaRadio.com. The interview will be posted on Tuesday, January 30. Please submit your dough-related questions in this thread.

Thanks,
Lucas

I have a deck oven and need to know how I get my dough to cook like it was made in a conveyor belt oven?

Joking aside, I am curious to hear what the difference a deck oven and conveyor oven cooks dough at. I’m talking about end result product taste.

This has been a heated debate in a thread for the past couple of days and I would like Tom’s straight up opinion.

Thank you

I own a small pizzeria and I am having an issue with my dough and the way it is cooking, and the way it looks when it is done cooking in the oven.

I make the dough on a daily basis in the evening. I have a small mixing bowl about a 16 quart. I use 8 quarts of flour, 1/2 salt, 1 1/2 sugar, 1 lb of butter, 1 cup of olive oil, 4 1/2 cups of water and 2 tablespoons of yeast.

Once I mix it all togther, I make my dough balls and then I refridgerate it over night. In the morning, I take them out and place on top of the oven to rise and come to room temp. I then I hand toss and screen my dough and place back in the fridge.

My question is: Am I killing the yeast when I bring it out of the fridge,bring to room temp, screen and place back in the fridge or freezer? Once it has come up to room temp, do I have to use it right away? My pizza is cooking flat and thin. I don’t like the way it looks and I want my customers to enjoy the pizza. Please help.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Audra E.

I already asked this question and someone was kind enough to answer. I am looking for a little more information so I am directing this question to you.
Which mixer is best for making pizza dough, fork mixer or spiral mixer? I suppose I should add in the standard planetary mixer.
Which mixer incorparates more air into the dough and is this imporant for pizza dough?
Which ever mixer you feel is better in the production of pizza dough do you know who manufactures the best one.

Thanking you in advance,

Hi Tom,

I have been having a problem with my dough sticking to the pizza disks. The disks are about 6 years old and were working fine. Then about 6 months ago the pizzas started sticking to them. I have tried everything I know to fix the problem, even re-seasoned them. They are still sticking. I am using the same flour, yeast, salt and sugar, the only thing I changed was switching from vegetable oil to olive oil. I even tried going back to vegetable oil to see if that would fix the problem but it didn’t. Any HELP would be APPRICIATED.

Thanks,

Bhall

Here’s one for you Tom,

I’ve been told that Hi-Gluten flour used in pizza dough is harder to digest, and is basically “not good” for human consumption because of this fact. Because of this, my franchisor is trying to convince me to use regular bakers flour in my recipe for pizza dough. I, of course, do NOT want to do this because with bakers flour, the outer crust breaks down when we stretch the pizzas and we have problems with thin spots, etc.

What is your take on the use of Hi-Gluten vs. regular bakers flour (besides the protein content)?

-J_r0kk

Hey Tom,
There is one problem with my dough. After my pizza comes out of the oven it tastes great, good flavor, great bread texture. But let the pizza sit for 30 min, or send it on a longer delivery and the crust on the bottom of the pizza becomes tough. What could be the cause to this, and is there any way to make a pizza more delivery friendly? We use hot bags of course on delivery’s and the pizza always arrives fresh. its just tougher than a few minutes out of the oven. Thanks for any input.
Will

[quote]

I own a small pizzeria and I am having an issue with my dough and the way it is cooking, and the way it looks when it is done cooking in the oven.

I make the dough on a daily basis in the evening. I have a small mixing bowl about a 16 quart. I use 8 quarts of flour, 1/2 salt, 1 1/2 sugar, 1 lb of butter, 1 cup of olive oil, 4 1/2 cups of water and 2 tablespoons of yeast.

Once I mix it all togther, I make my dough balls and then I refridgerate it over night. In the morning, I take them out and place on top of the oven to rise and come to room temp. I then I hand toss and screen my dough and place back in the fridge.

My question is: Am I killing the yeast when I bring it out of the fridge,bring to room temp, screen and place back in the fridge or freezer? Once it has come up to room temp, do I have to use it right away? My pizza is cooking flat and thin. I don’t like the way it looks and I want my customers to enjoy the pizza. Please help.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Audra E.


Lucas Leigh
PMQ Magazine
Associate Editor/Web Editor
[\quote]
Im pretty sure you can use your dough right after it’s mixed. If you do, the quality will definately improve. what you are describing are symptoms of old dough. You’re not killing your yeast, unless your water temperature is 120 degrees or over. I would suggest using your dough fresh and making it in the morning. Also, another tip. When I made huge amounts of bread for anothe restaurant I worked at, I’m talking 50 pounds of flour big. I mixed my yeast in with my water before pouring it into the dough.

Have you tried mixing the high gluten flour with the bakers flour?