Ferris Wheel Style Ovens.....A well beated down subject....

I have been asking some very dull oven questions…It looks like a fish oven is the way I will be going…Anyone using one?..Or a Culter or Baxter…Picard?..I am moving towards them over a Roto-Flex as I think they might be a bit more easier to use and more energy efficient…I love to two windows on the Roto-Flex but I think the Ferris Wheel style is better suited for what I am after…Anyone with any insights Please feel free to share them…

Thank You

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

We have a Fish in one of our stores. I have not worked with a Rotoflex anymore than thirty minutes but I was not comfortable with it. If you are going with a deck oven I think the Fish is the way to go (or that type). We have rotating deck ovens in all our stores, however, I plan on seriously looking into a conveyor oven this year. I believe it is better suited to our type of pizza and I can’t argue with the consistency and speed of the conveyor. If you ever plan to open more locations I think its another “pro” in the conveyor’s corner.

The Fish has been solid for us.

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

Do you cook directy on the steel shelves or have you added stones or use a screen…It is interesting that you feel you will get the bake you want out of the conveyor…I am surpised but it is good to hear…

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

We cook directly on the steel shelves.

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

We use screens as it is easier to train and handle imo.

We do a thick crusted, heavy topped pizza. From what I have gathered, it would seem the conveyor would give a better bake to such a pie.

Also, as already discussed on these boards, the conveyor will give consistent results. We also want to expand and see deck road a harder way to go given the quality control issues of a deck.

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

I am looking to do a thin crust…perhaps just slightly thicker than a NY…I want it to be crisp but not a cracker like crust…

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

Reel type ovens are commonly used in the Chicago area for baking pizzas. One great advantage of the reel type oven over other oven designs, is their capacity when long baking times are the order of the day. Keep in mind that in Chicago, it is common to bake a thin crust pizza for 25-minutes or more, and a pan style may be baked for 40-minutes or more. I was raised with these ovens in both the baking indusrty (they’re the back bone of many retail bakeries) and in the pizza industry (I’m from Chicago). I few things that “mother” never told you about these ovens will help you to keep repairs to an absolute minimum, over the life of the oven, which is historically, a very long time. Always run the onen in reverse (shelf moves from top to bottom when viewed at the door) during the warm-up and cool down periods. Yes, you read that right, cool down period. When you are done baking, turn the heat off, and reverse the rotation direction of the oven while it is cooling down. The reason for this is to allow the shelf bearing to wear evenly. Periodically, lubricate the shelf bearings. Check with the manufacturer for the type of lubricant (generally graphite), and the frequency of lubrication, and you should be good to go for many years. Also, the stone, or composite deck is the most commonly used when baking pizzas.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

Thank you Tom,

I had the maintenance question and brought it up to Fish and they recommended what you said and that using the graphite weekly would greatly extend the life of oven, other than that just keep it clean.

Re: Ferris Wheel Style Ovens…A well beated down subject.

Here is a tip on lubricating the oven. Lubricate it first thing in the day when you fire it up, this will allow plenty of time for the solvent to fully evaporate before the oven sees any pizzas.
There will be an inspection cover on one side of the oven. Make sure the oven is installed so this cover/hatch is accessable at all times.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor