Found lots of stock photos...

Found a cool place with all kinds of pictures. Sure best to use our own but thought some might like the site.

istockphoto.com

Sure it is best to use your own if they are of professional quality…However, I tend to reject most of the photos supplied by clients because they lack quality needed…And when I use stock photos, most come from the site you referenced…

A long time ago I used to do commercials for a local FOX affiliate in Nebraska. We had a lot of restaurants ask that we put video of their food up on the commercials. We never refused because they were paying customers, but the video always turned out bad. Basically, the food looked lackluster on television. I started bringing in vaseline and rubbing the food down with that, which ticked off the restaurant owners because they saw that as a waste of money. But for your own photos, vaseline and lots and lots and lots of lighting. There is, however, a learning curve in figuring out how much vaseline to put on various different food items. You, for example, don’t need as much for cheese as you do for a bun.

I do all of our graphics design myself (print and online) and istockphoto.com is like crack to me. I find a cool picture and then find a way to design around it. You can find anything on there. I can’t tell you how much money I’ve spent there, sometimes to make artwork that I never end up using… I just can’t resist doing something with the picture!

On average you’re going to spend about 8 bucks per picture and you get to make 500,000 impressions with it - it’s tough to beat that.

One note on istockphoto is that you can’t use their pictures on Facebook. Facebook takes ownership of any picture you post and that violates istockphoto’s licensing terms.

We’ve also looked there and found lots of pictures we’d like to use. I’m never sure which size I need to purchase for print work, etc. Piper – what rule of thumb do you use when choosing the size for your printing? I’d hate to purchase one and find out that the quality was not good because we didn’t buy the right size.

You want to buy it big enough that you won’t have to enlarge it at all. First, always make sure you are buying 300dpi images - 72 is not high enough quality for print work. When you find an image that you like, click on the “inches” column on the photo’s page. That will tell you what the dpi is and the size in inches. Then you just need to fit it to whatever you’re designing.

Medium will probably be the minimum size you want to buy because everything smaller is usually 72dpi.

I, too, have spent a few bux on that site…get the largest pic you can afford, as you may wish later to use it again in poster size, not the small size you 1st bought/used…

Remember, you can shrink w/o any problems, but the reverse is not always the same…

I have used a jpg and blown it up a tad 2 much, but it was high & the line of sight was distant, so you couldn’t really see the pixelization as much…banners can take a good quality image & handle the pixels better as well…

Thanks for the advice Piper and Patriot…very useful and helpful. Now I think I’ll do some photo shopping!