Help with pricing out utilities.

So I’m trying to find out the cost differences between ovens via:
MM ps360 which burns: 220v, 1ph, 10A and uses 135,000 btu/hr
Factoring 60 pizzas per hour (from MM customer support)
vs.
Lincoln 1130 which burns: 120/220v 1ph, 48A and no gas
Factoring 25 pizzas per hour (from Lincoln spec. sheet )
vs
Lincoln 1132 which burns: 220v 3p, 28A and no gas
Factoring 25 pizzas per hour (from Lincoln spec. sheet )

How does the cost of the gas/electric work with the specs?

I’ve been reading that many of you are switching over to the electric conveyors because of the $$$ savings… I assume you are all referring to 3-phase though?

@George Mills, do you have any input on this?

As far as I know electric ovens are more costly to operate be they 3 ph or single ph.

If there is something new on the market that changes the above I have not seen it

George Mills

So I’m trying to find out the cost differences between ovens .

In order to do that you will have to have the cost of gas and electric in your shop then calculate the costs difference using that information.

George Mills

Here’s the electrical calculations I come up with. You’ll be able to calculate your gas costs from your gas bill. For the electric, just look at what you’re paying per kWh.

MM PS360: 2200W (2.2kW) + Gas cost

Lincoln 1130: 10560W (10.56kw) @ 220V

Lincoln 1132: 10669W (10.67kW)

I’m kind of surprised the gas oven pulls that much electricity.

Motors take a lot of “juice”…

But I don’t think a continuously running motor can be using that much.

Now that I’ve thought it through…

It looks like that oven has a 1/3 hp blower motor. If it’s 80% efficient that’s 307W.

The conveyor drive motor is 1/8 hp. At 80% efficiency that’s 115W.

The electronics can’t be burning another 1,778W. The numbers given must be the rating (needed to handle inrush, which should only be once per day) and not the usage. That changes the “savings” (or lack thereof) calculations substantially.

If the electric oven specs are also peak rating, then calculating the costs isn’t possible with these numbers. We’d need specs under actual usage. You need to know what percentage you’re going to run it at, and how often (if at all) it may cycle.

Which makes me wonder… Why do they have a gas oven drawing so little power set up for 220V? The motors don’t have a massive inrush to necessitate it. The combined power could be handled just fine by a 110V, 20A circuit that is common in commercial applications. Those motors draw less power than a hair dryer on low.

Is it to make them more international? Is it to reduce the heat from the motors? I’m not questioning their decision, I’m just curious.

I’m not so sure there is a trend toward electric ovens. Has George seen such a trend? Usually it’s the other way around where someone is getting a monster electric bill and is penciling out the cost of running natural gas lines into the business versus continuing to run the electric oven. In most areas gas ovens are less costly to operate. It’s really going to depend upon your electric rate and whether there is tiered billing. Which is to say, the more you use the higher the cost per KWH for subsequent usage cohorts. Additionally, many have said that gas ovens don’t dry the product out as much as electric because water is released during the combustion of natural gas or propane-i.e., a better bake.

I’m not so sure there is a trend toward electric ovens. Has George seen such a trend? No George Mills