Pre Prepared Bases

I want to prepare my based in advance, Pizza hut do this, but they have covers designed or there pans.
I am using screens, and I am thinking to opening the dough up, forming it and saucing and cheesing it. Then to place it on dough trays and leaving it in the cooler until needed. Just wondering how you guys do it.

Do you pre-cook your hamburgers or pre-make your sandwhichs prior to your expected rush? I think not…

Unless you are running a buffet operation, prepare your food ála minute…

What would Gordon Ramsey think of your operation…lol…

CiCi’s hada policy…25 minuteseach for undressed dough, for topped pizzas ready for te oven and 25 for cooked pies under the heat lamp…

It should take just a few minutes to open & dress any pizza…

I posted this thread, for advice, not a stripping down, you must use cooked meats, or do you cook them just before you open your dough, like Gordon Ramsey may do. Since my dough balls sits in my cooker for 3 days, prepared, they might as well sit in the cooler all stretched out ready to go. One of my main reason, was that as I am just starting out, with my first store, doing this could reduce my labor cost, by doing this.

No stripping down intended/meant, but this forum generally reveals the cold hard truth…

Do you have any experience in the pizza field? Perhaps not…

Covered dough balls in the cooler are less apt to dry out vs. opened dough…

Most here use cooked meats, for safety reasons as well as taste & convenience…

Saving labor is on everyone’s mind, but one experienced pie maker can produce a ai amount of volume…

You also don’t state if you have a deck oven or a conveyor…that makes a difference too…

Good Luck!

In my experience the acid in the tomato sauce causes the dough to degrade after around a half hour. Maybe that is where the above mentioned 25 minute rule came into existence.

I find for the best results I do everything to order. I explain to my customers that good food takes time to be made right.

We are using a single XLT 32 deck, maybe then not saucing and cheeseing them just make the bases.

Vern,

I assume you are talking about the SKINS or MIA’s

on a Friday or Saturday night we would slap out about 30-40 MIA’s abd put them in a rack and then cover with a trash bag to keep moist but never sauced or cheesed until needed

I hope this helps

Dennis

opening a dough out and lightly saucing is one technique that the good Doctor teaches actually.

Vern;
You can open the dough balls and place them onto your baking platform (pan, screen or disk) and store them in the cooler on a tree rack. Be sure to cover the rack with a plastic bag after about 30-minutes to prevent drying. When you get slammed, remove from the cooler, restretch if necessary to fit to the pan, etc., then dress and bake. My preference is to remove the dough skin from the pan necessary or not, and then placing it back onto the screen/pan again. This is to prevent dough from possibly entering the openings in the pan or screen, thus locking itself onto the pan/screen. If your dough is sufficiently firm to resist flowing into the pan openings you can proceed to sauce and cheese the dough skins, but before you do, be sure to LIGHTLY brush the surface with oil to create a barrier to moisture from the sauce, if you don’t there is a probability that you may end up with a dreaded gum line under the sauce. As to how long you can keep the dressed dough skin in the cooler will depend upon how well the dough, now with the added weight of the sauce and cheese resists flowing into the pan/screen openings, and how stable your sauce is. If it isn’t very stable you will notice water seperating from the sauce after a short time (place a few spoons of sauce on a plate and observe to see how long it resists seperating) this will give you some indication of how long you might be able to hold the partially dressed dough skin in the cooler.
With both cold and warm dough skins being baked in an air impingement oven you might experience some issues, especially if you are pushing minimum baking time. A possible solution is to adjust the baking time and temperature to give you a slightly longer bake as this will create baking conditions more favorable to the different temperature dough skins going into the oven, thus ensuring that both types of dough skins are properly baked.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor