Significant gum lines on my pan style pizzas. Help?

I’ve been having issues with the gum lines for a while now, and I cannot figure out a way to get rid of them! Sometimes they aren’t so bad, and other times they are really bad… The dough becomes so doughy and and when eating the pizza it seems like the dough is uncooked.
Have anyone successfully got rid of gum lines here?

Can you post come pictures, just to see what your talking about

Ok I will take some pics and upload them swap.
anyway a thought came to my head today. We always dock our dough right before baking, that creates little holes in the dough. Could it be that the moisture is going through them little holes and making the dough really doughy?

The docking process is to eliminate bubbling. I doubt the gum line has anything to do with docking. I would look more at your time and temperature settings to address the issue.

Here is a link to an article on the gum line topic http://www.pmq.com/September-October-2003/In-Lehmanns-Terms/

I have attached a picture for you. What are your thoughts

If you can - take a clean razor blade (box cutter, exacto knife, etc.) flip a piece over and cut through the slice from the bottom with the razor. This will give you a clear picture of what’s going on with your bake of the dough - the pizza cutter tends to crush the structure of your bread as it cuts. And as Daddio said and linked to - time and temp adjustments make a big impact on dough quality and performance.

My oven temp currently is 240 degrees Celsius and the bake time is 7 and a half Minutes. Is that a good time and temp?

And I will try that… But what is it that I’m looking for when I cut through?

When you cut through the pizza slice from the bottom you are looking for a gray line below the sauce 1/8-inch thick or thicker. A thin gray line is normal. Best thing to do is to take a picture of the slice after you have cut it, a good close up of the cut area will allow us to better determine if you have a true gum line or not. The best oven temperature and baking time is the one that gives you the best pizza. Can you send us some pictures of your baked pizzas too?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

When you cut through the pizza slice from the bottom you are looking for a gray line below the sauce 1/8-inch thick or thicker. A thin gray line is normal. Best thing to do is to take a picture of the slice after you have cut it, a good close up of the cut area will allow us to better determine if you have a true gum line or not. The best oven temperature and baking time is the one that gives you the best pizza. Can you send us some pictures of your baked pizzas too?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Ok, here is a picture of the same pizza with the gumline posted before. I will take some more and upload them too.

As for the close up, I am running a test pizza as we speak and I will cut it up and take some pics

Thanks doc!

Oops, didn’t attach the picture. Here it is

i mean a picture of the gum line, with the cheese removed, you know like up close with a knife pushing against the gum line to see whats really going on

Here are some more pictures.
From what i have seen doing this method of checking, the gum line doesn’t seem that bad. But what happens is when your actually eating a slice of the pizza and you bite into it… The gum line from under the sauce sticks to the bottom of the pizza, making it look like a lot more gum line there there actually might be. The dough doesn’t spring back up and show the little holes and cooked texture like u see in the crust

Thanks dude for the link

Looks awesome to me

It really doesn’t look like you have a problem with a gum line. You might try reducing the oven temperature to 226C and adjust the baking time by about 1-minute longer to see if that will firm up the crumb structure.
I find it curious that you mention the crumb structure compresses when bitten into. I know you have been looking at adding additional malt to the dough formula, when malt is used at an excessive level it can result in the crumb structure becoming excessively soft and sticky. In extreme cases it will even result in the crumb sticking to the roof of the mouth or teeth as a bite is taken from the slice. Additionally, the addition of oil the dough formula gives a softer, more tended eating crumb structure. It is entirely possible that with your flour the addition of oil is creating an overly soft and tended crumb structure, to test this I would suggest deleting the oil from your dough formula to see if you see any improvement.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

I will try this. Thanks tom

I’d look at cutting back on your top cheese a bit. Looks like heavy cheese on top of your toppings which would trap moisture from vegies etc.
Try cutting back back by 1/3. You will probably find there will be less moisture under the topped cheese letting the dough firm right through.
Nothing wrong with the appearance to show any major problem going by the pics posted.
Dave