Take N Bake dough procedure.

Can anyone tell me if any dough adjustements need to be made for TnB pizzas? Is yeast/water/kneading process the same or does it have to be changed due to the time the TnB pizza will be stored in the refrigerator/freezer and baked? :roll:

If your yeast level is normal, that is, 0.75 to 1.5% as compressed yeast (0.25 to 0.5% as IDY) or (0.375 to 0.75% as IDY), your yeast level will be fine. Use your normal dough mixing, but do make sure to take the dough directly from the mixer to the bench for scaling and balling, then directly into the cooler. Don’t temper the dough balls as you would a regular pizza, instead, take the dough right from the cooler and open it to order. This way you will be sending the pizza out on a cold dough skin. To speed things up a bit, you can pre-open the dough balls into skins, and store in the cooler until needed to fill an order. Other than that, you might want to increase the sugar level to something around 5% of the flour weight to ensure the pizza will brown in a home oven (that’s what the “big boys” do. I like to use the paperboard trays by either Menasha Packaging or Pactiv. Just be sure to give the tray a very light application of oil, as the crust will sometimes stick if this isn’t done.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Thank you for the reply Tom, as always your answers and advice is extremely helpful. One question though,wont the pizza balls if taken directly from the fridge and opened into skins,not rise because the dough hasnt proofed enough? Also, are these paperboard trays you mentioned ovenable? Like the pizza will cook on top of these in a home oven that is set to about 500 F?

Where we’re talking about thin crust pizzas, you don’t need to allow the dough to proof/rise in order for it to rise in the oven during baking. Yes, those paperboard trays are ovenable. If you have a Papa Murphy’s near you take a look at their pizza presentation. They use the Pactiv trays. Some people use nothing but a silicone sheet under the T&B pizza, but I don’t like that idea as it doesn’t provide any support for the pizza, where as the trays provide a baking container that provides support making for easier and safer handling of the pizza, and it also becomes a serving tray too.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,I went to the Pactiv site like you mentioned, but I saw that it said that their ovenable pizza trays should not be used over 400 F. How would the cooking process be under these circumstances,apart from taking longer? Would it boil the ingredients and make the pep/cheese/veggies look like thay are floating on the sauce?

What we have found is that the trays hold up under higher temperatures than stated so long as there is dough in the pan/tray. The dough has a cooling affect on the tray so it doesn’t reach higher temperature of the oven. We just baked some at 450F last week with great success, and no flaming pizzas or trays. Get a few and give them a try.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Lol,good to know that no pizza trays burst into flames,that would be unsettling and wreak havok and pandemonium to say the least. I will order some this week and start expirementing(I’ll keep my fire extinguisher handy just in case,lol). :lol:

Just remember to put a very light application of a spray oil onto the pan before you put the dough into it. This will ensure a positive release every time.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Spray oil,? Can I use a light coat regular vegetable oil? :roll:

Yes you can, no need to overdo it though, if the oil makes a smear on the tray when rubbed, you have enough oil on it. A lot of times I wil use a product such as Whirl, and just give it a light misting of oil.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor