who deep frys and sauces there own wings?

Wondering what your process for this is and how long and how hot you cook the wings?

I fry and sauce my own. We use fresh, never frozen, wing that are 6-9 per pound. Par-frying is an imperative. We par-fry our wings for 6 minutes at 350F. Spread in dough boxes on counter for 10 minutes to let high heat drop off. Cross stack in cooler until 70F or lower (about 15 to 20 minutes), then into plastic tubs to chill the rest of the way off.

To order, we refresh/finish the wings at 350F for 90 to 105 seconds. Toss wings with sauce and serve or package.

Your cook times will vary depending on size of wing parts. basically, I tested over and over to get them just to temp without wqorrying about crispy or dry meat. That was the time-temp measure I use for standards. I check one or two meaty ones per batch to make sure we are at 160F internal temp prior to cooling steps.

Hey there, Im from australia so not sure if you mean chicken wings or buffelo wings, but here goes, we use chicken wings, we dont fry them. We smoke our wings till they are 99% cooked. they are then placed in our oven to finish them (as the customer oders). Once cooked we use a simple BBQ suace. We find this method extremly simple and every one who eats them loves them. they have a fantiastic smoke flavour and the meat falls off it. If your still ready sorry for the spelling. LOL…

I will be starting a new job soon as GM of an indy! at this shop we fry our wings and make our own sauce. That in my opinion is the only way to go. Pizza ovens weren’t really made to do wings, they do okay… but not good enough. At my current job we are using the ovens to cook our wings that come pre sauced and we have to run them thru twice, sometimes three times before their temp gets up to 160 and we thaw them before hand! If you’re using jumbo wings and cooking one or two orders at a time with good grease, it should take 10 minutes or less to cook.

It akes me about 12 minutes to cook 40 pieces in afryer basket at 350F. That is if we cook from raw. If we par-fry, then 7 minutes unitial fry and 2 to 2.5 minutes finish.

hello guest,I have won best of Philly for 2 years w/ our wings.We use fresh jumbo wings that we fry @350’ for 9-11 min. then toss in our sauces this is the only way to go.they will be crispier than the norm but survey says most peeps likes thier wings well done.We get peeps in everyday that says the same thing that they love that we cook our wings crispie…just some ‘food for thought’ Good luck Niccademo

Hey Goomba,

How many fryers you running? I have 2 full size fryers (4 baskets), but I cant imagine having a basket in there for 10 min straight…it would hold things up big time for me. We use fresh jumbo 6-9ct parbake for 10-15 min, then fry to order for 3-4 minutes which speeds things up considerably.

This is how it’s done in Buffalo. It’s the only acceptable way to serve them here. Why all the extra work with par frying? Doesn’t sound logical to me. A crispy wing is a wing cooked properly, a well done wing is something different, basically it’s overcooked. Baked wings, never!!! If you’re serving the wings ‘take-out’ then you want a well vented container or they will steam themselves and not be crisp.

In a word . . . “volume”. When I get orders on my wing station on a Friday or Saturday night for upwards of 160 wings at one time, and I have one 45# fryer, it will take upwards of 45 minutes to cook just those wings. IF more come in, then we are absolutely hosed. I cannot justify at this point buying and managing another fryer for just those nights when we manage quite swimmingly with our current processes. Par Frying is not extra work, but staging the cooking process for a busy restaurant kitchen so as to produce the same product quality for huge numbers of wings.

We pop out about 100 pounds on a busy Friday night . . . between 5 and 10PM. That is about only 650 pieces, but no chance of cooking each and every order from fresh to served as it comes in given the surges and other kitchen demands. Tues to Thurs will usually work out, but high volume in my shop requires more fryers or par cooking.

Nick has the right plan for kitchens short on fryers.
If you use the par-cooked wing the next day 99.99% will never know they weren’t fully cooked fresh.

I won’t get into the 350o- 375o debate but for those of you that fry at 350o you will actually get a better and cripier end product by par-cooking.
In part due to the time that the wings are par-cooked and in the cooler they’ll be drying out some. Please bag the box or you’ll end up with a sub par product.
There’s a national chain that leaves their wings open to air in a cooler to fake crispness because they use cheap oil and lower cooking temp :cry:

we’re a volume wing seller as well…but we marinate our wings overnite in a product from SYSCO that is designed, in part, to pull the blood out & away from the bone…

we par-fry 10# @ a time, chill back down for later use…

we blend our own sauces w/RedHot…

after tossing them, we retherm them in the MM 360 on parchment paper…

they come out crisp & no red near the bone, same time as the ordered pie…

We use the one fryer to multi-task several fried items, so we run at 350F. My preference would be to par-fry at 350 and finish at 375 for a shorter time. My experience is that it gives a crispier finish and better color. Alas, we do not have that option until we get a second fryer online.

Well. I guess things are just done differently in different places. I only par fry twice a year, New Years Eve and Superbowl Sunday. I par fry early that day and use them later that day because 80% of the days business is within a few hours and I can’t meet the demand. It’s done because of volume. It sickens me to know that what I am serving is not fresh. I do receive a number of calls on these days from customers that can tell the difference and I take care of them.

Mr. Sasso, you wrote “Par Frying is not extra work, but staging the cooking process for a busy restaurant kitchen so as to produce the same product quality for huge numbers of wings.”
I disagree. If you’re par frying one day and not par frying the rest of the week then your product is not of the same quality everyday.
You also wrote, “I cannot justify at this point buying and managing another fryer for just those nights … but no chance of cooking each and every order from fresh to served as it comes in given the surges and other kitchen demands. Tues to Thurs will usually work out, but high volume in my shop requires more fryers or par cooking.” You have just justified your need for another fryer.
In a word… “volume”. Doesn’t having the volume and/or wanting more volume justify a second fryer?

I have 3 - 45# fryers and sell 350# - 500# of wings on a Friday, along with all my other fryables all using the same 3 fryers. Good food takes time to prepare, this isn’t “fast-food”. If we get “busy” (sometimes I have 700+ pieces of wings on order at once) we leave one basket open and fill, without counting, the remaining baskets with wings and repeat until the rush is over. Yeah, sometimes I end up with 10, 20 or 30 pieces leftover after the rush but by that time my staff is ready for a meal/smoke break and the wings are there for them, already cooked.

Patriot’s Pizza – you say, “we’re a volume wing seller as well… we par-fry 10# @ a time…” Depending on the size of the wing you buy you’re talking about par cooking 60-70 wings (the size I use). That would almost fit in one basket. This is why I mention “extra work”. Why do something twice?

I’m not trying to offend anyone and I’m sorry if I did. Being from Buffalo, I’m just trying to give tips on serving “buffalo wings” vs. “buffalo style wings”. We just call them wings, the rest of the world calls them “buffalo wings”. Philly has a “cheese steak”. Everyone in my area sells “Philly style cheese steaks” and we call them “steak and cheese”, “steak sub” or “steak hoagie” and it’s not made the same as in Philly, not even close. We don’t sell Steak subs “wiz wit” or “wiz witout” in Buffalo. (“wiz wit” would be with yellow cheese spread [cheese-wiz] and onions, “wiz witout” has no onions.) REAL wings are NEVER baked in Buffalo.

Guest from Buffalo…

I failed 2 mention we use a pressure fryer/broaster…cook ours for 4 minutes…don’t like to cook any more than 10# @ once, but could…

we’ll go thru couple 100 #'s on a Friday…

wings come out of fryer cooked w/no blood & the oven “cooks in” the sauce & flavor and come out quite crispy, timed with the pizza…

No, it doesn’t. A second fryer for one night a week is frivelous when I can use slower time Wed and Thur to prep the volume for weekend rush. Extra grease, space, hood space, and maintenance would take possibly years to recover at my current sales volume. We DO pre cook for every day. Weekend is just prime time.

I have 3 - 45# fryers and sell 350# - 500# of wings on a Friday, along with all my other fryables all using the same 3 fryers. Good food takes time to prepare, this isn’t “fast-food”. If we get “busy” (sometimes I have 700+ pieces of wings on order at once) we leave one basket open and fill, without counting, the remaining baskets with wings and repeat until the rush is over.

Patriot’s Pizza – you say, “we’re a volume wing seller as well… we par-fry 10# @ a time…” Depending on the size of the wing you buy you’re talking about par cooking 60-70 wings (the size I use). That would almost fit in one basket. This is why I mention “extra work”. Why do something twice?

The fryer capacity you have would be huge overkill at my store. Your equipment would eat up space and be unused 85% of the time. I am very glad it works for your store and your concept . . . mine is different.

I can fit almost 40 pieces in one basket in my fryer . . . 75 to 80 in the fryer at once. That sort of math just won’t cut it in my place. We simply cannot fry all wings to order from fresh and make it through the rush. We tried for 20 months and found the par-cooking godsend. Mind you, we are not incompetent, and were using all sorts of tools and supports to get things done. Wings were the constant dogpile of the shop on weekends. A second fryer would eventually offer more flexibility. That will come probably later this year. And we will still precook our wings. That is what we do now, and it is quite possibly heresy to the Orthodoxy of Buffalo Wings. I can live with that. :slight_smile:

People drive 30 miles past 4 restaurants to come to our wings, so our market is acdepting and lauding of the product. I’ve done blind tasting and find that I actually prefer our par-cooked wings to fresh cooked. I worjked for weeks to come up with our process that is really, really good when done precisely to the times and standards I have written up. Given our sauces, they stay crisper longer. I do not serve buffalo wings, I sell hot wings and other flavors. I serve a Grantville Cheese Steak.

We are not trendy or in need of duplicating icons. We take the idea and do it our way to serve our customers.

We actually use Tyson Oven Baked Wings… They come in fully cooked and frozen, then we drop them in the deep fryer for 4 minutes and we use WY’s Wing Sauce. They come out great.

I’v experimented a little bit with raw chicken but haven’t had much luck.

WOW! Great information.Can I freeeze the wings after par frying for 6min@350? hpw many days you can keep them in cooler if not frozen after par frying? Also, I bread’em instead of saucing. Should I bread’em before or after par frying?

I move them within 3 days after par-cooking . . . that’s the volume we prepare and make. If we stock up, we should be able to keep them 7 days. Actually, I have taken some home that kept very well up to 9 days. DO NOT TRY THAT AT YOUR SHOP. 7 day at most, but quality suffers a little after 3 days for my preferences. 4 on outside, but safe and perfectly servable up to 7 days. probably only 75 to 80% as good at 7 days out.

       Hello guest in Buff. It seems that you are doing the same thing that I am.So why are you quoting my advice on cooking wings and I don't call them 'Buff wings' because I am someone who don't believe they started there but I won't go there.I am in Philly and we've been making fried chx.wings since the sixties along w/ ou chse. stks and hoagies.


              Niccademo