absentee owner

Discussion in 'The Think Tank' started by wickedcheesy, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. wickedcheesy

    wickedcheesy Member

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    hi all, i am kicking around idea of moving down south but keeping my restaurant. I am seeking to replacing me with a general manager with great pay and bonuses. Was wondering if anyone has done this or is currently doing it?
     
  2. Gunner

    Gunner New Member

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    If you already lived “down south”, would you buy Wicked Cheesy & hire someone to run it (into the ground) for you? o_O
     
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  3. The Fat Boy

    The Fat Boy Active Member

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    I have a GM? kind of. I don't work the store or run the day to day, but I check in on them daily call at least twice a day and i do mystery shoppers with my online ordering with pick ups and delivery to a friends house

    if you can't check in on them with a frequency then you have no idea how it is running
     
  4. wickedcheesy

    wickedcheesy Member

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    Precisely, that was my intent. I would run the restaurant remotely (cameras, pos ghosting, conference calls, secret shopper efficiency ratings, family member visits) and also come up once a month for a weekend.

    The Fat Boy........Your telling me no owners are letting their managers run their day to day operations?
     
  5. The Fat Boy

    The Fat Boy Active Member

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    No I mean if you are an owner operator it is going to be tough to just hand over the reigns to someone not a vested as you and still be profitable, customers are used to seeing you running the place. They feel empowered to say they know the owner.
    Some might not want to deal with a newbie
     
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  6. wickedcheesy

    wickedcheesy Member

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    oh ok, of course I get that. When I am working, I think we run at a 90-95% effeciency. If i can still run 80-85%, then i think its a win.
     
  7. famousperry

    famousperry Active Member

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    I have not missed a Friday night in 21yrs and maybe take 1 Saturday night a year (we close EVERY Sunday and for 1 week in the summer). I have been to many Pizza Expo seminars where I have heard the line that "OK is good enough" but I honestly feel that the reason we are successful is that we are not just ok. The biggest reason is that my brother-in-law and I are committed to the business. Growing the business is not a problem but decreasing our hours is tough. We are currently at approx. 62hrs a week which is nothing compared what we used to do back in the day. I just don't think that I can handle mediocrity well. Please let us know how that works out for you...Honestly, you will be my hero and I will rooting for you!
     
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  8. wickedcheesy

    wickedcheesy Member

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    Thats the problem, I dont have a partner and im working 100+ hours. How do owners with 5 locations split their time, they can't be at all locations 60 hours? I have been open for 12 years and have worked 60 to 100 hours per week for that whole time. It is a quality of life issue right now.
     
  9. brad randall

    brad randall Active Member

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    First step is to get all your procedures in place: operation manuals, training manuals, order guides, inventory, checklists for opening, checklists for closing, checklists for cleaning, etc... Document everything that you do and all that you make sure gets done. It's a mind-numbing process and it suuuucks.

    Second step is to begin bringing in shift managers one at a time. Begin taking days off. Then take some nights off.
    Learn to say the phrase "How do you think we should handle that?" and give the entire staff the confidence to own problems and solve them.

    Three. Peel your hours down to 40/week focusing on the specific tasks that you would have a general manager do like hiring, training, scheduling, ordering, book-keeping organization, overseeing, reviewing, retraining, etc...

    Four. Hire that G.M. (or promote one of the shift managers if you made a great hire). Train them to replace you. Shift to working on your store instead of in it - things like advertising, marketing, meeting with the GM to discuss the accounting statements.

    Five. Step back. Let the business run itself for a while. See where things break down. Adjust your procedures accordingly. Wash, lather, rinse and repeat.

    Six. Feel comfortable taking a two-week vacation where you'll be out of cell phone range? Take one! Did the store run burn down? No? Does it seem like everything went smoothly while you were away? Great!

    Seven. Step Away.

    One caveat: I haven't stepped away. My business partner and I still do some things like light book keeping and some ordering that gives us a perspective from which to continue to grow the company and saves us some money (I have kids in college!). We're still in a building phase and like to tweak operations and open new concepts/stores.
     
  10. woodfiredandrew

    woodfiredandrew Member

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    if you are there 80/wk then no wonder you are 90-95% efficient. You have ask your self are you a good leader or good worker. Good leader build great team, teach them and learn to trust 'em. like someone said earlier back off slowly while you are in town and watch from the distance. if you happy with it then you have a shot. you need to hire a good GM who is there for more than a paycheck, and honest. key is finding honest person then you can teach 'em.
    Good luck
    Andy
     
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